The application of digital video plotter (DVP) systems to the location and orientation of open pit wall slope features

Abstract Terrestrial photogrammetry has been used for many years to build three-dimensional pictures for analytical purposes. Photographs can include images from open pit mine walls, ground topography, mine buildings infrastructure or accident scenes. Analysis and co-ordinate estimation in early photogrammetric systems demanded the use of specialized and costly optical-mechanical stereocomparators. Few of these instruments could be interfaced with computers to provide databases, and all required trained personnel with good perspective vision to collect data. Digital photogrammetric software has replaced these older systems, and the digital video plotter (DVP) is a simple computerized system utilizing readily available PCs to quickly produce a stereoscopic model of any scene where an area of overlap exists in photographs taken from two different locations. Specialized cameras providing reference marks or grids on the photographs are still necessary for detailed analysis in three dimensions. This paper describes the application of DVP to the three-dimensional analysis of strike, dip and location of dominant fracture planes visible on an open pit wall slope, and the intersection of planar features which might reduce wall stability. Where reference survey points cannot be provided because access by personnel to the photographic scene is impossible for safety reasons, normal case terrestrial photogrammetry can provide the necessary control points for more complex aerial photogrammetry geometries. DVP recreates the geometry existing at the moment photographs are taken, providing the user with the ability to safely recreate, compare and analyze the structures determining the stability of open pit wall slopes.
Keywords: Digital video plotter (DVP), Digital photogrammetry, Three-dimensional analysis, Normal case geometry, Complex case geometry.
Full Access to Technical Paper
PDF version for $20.00
Search
Sort By:  Relevance
Showing results 1 - 5
Text
Summary: The current theory of how explosives fracture rock offers no explanation for the improvements in fragmentation and the reduction of fly rock and back break which occurs when an adequate inter-row delay time is used. Nor does it explain why fragmentation improves with rectangular drill patterns where the hole spacing may be as much as four times the hole burden. A new theory of rock fragmentation is proposed which builds on the existing theory. It offers rational explanations for the many...
Publication: CIM Bulletin
Author(s): P.H. Oliver
Keywords: Drill pattern, Blasting, Fragmentation, Fly rock, Back break, Inter-row delay time.
Issue: 1071
Volume: 96
Year: 2003
Text
Summary: The knowledge of the initial stress field is not always sufficient to ensure the stability of mining stopes due to the high-stress variations generated by mining. Monitoring of these openings is then necessary and can provide quantitative information (deformations and stress variations) as well as qualitative information (state of stability). An applied technique for following the variations of stress and deformation in static and dynamic conditions, in relation to the evaluation of the...
Publication: CIM Bulletin
Author(s): G. Ballivy, A.P. Bois, A. Ghorbal, V. Hajiabdolmajid, K. Saleh
Keywords: Stress variations, Stability, Monitoring, Deformations, Cylindre Instrumenté de l’Université de Sherbrooke (CIUS).
Issue: 1071
Volume: 96
Year: 2003
Text
Summary: The southwest wall of the Lornex Pit at the Highland Valley Copper mine has been experiencing slope displacements since 1978. Measures to manage the displacements on previous pushbacks have included stepping out, scheduling pushbacks to unload the crest of unstable areas, slope dewatering and mining with intensive slope monitoring. The final pushback on this wall is currently being mined and substantial modifications to the slope geometry could prove to be uneconomical. As a result, a...
Publication: CIM Bulletin
Author(s): H.W. Newcomen, L. Shwydiuk, C.S. Maggs
Keywords: Slope displacement, Pushbacks, Stability, Engineering geology, Hydrology,
Open pit.
Issue: 1071
Volume: 96
Year: 2003
Text
Summary: The most widely used method for predicting the onset of continuous caving is Laubscher’s caving chart. A detailed examination of this method was undertaken which concluded that it had limitations which may impact on results, particularly when dealing with stronger rock masses that are outside current experience. These limitations relate to inadequate guidelines for adjustment factors to rock mass rating (RMR), concerns about the position on the chart of critical case history data, undocumente...
Publication: CIM Bulletin
Author(s): R. Trueman, C. Mawdesley
Keywords: Cave initiation, Propagation, Laubscher caving chart, Numerical modelling, Mathews stability graph, Stability, Cavability.
Issue: 1071
Volume: 96
Year: 2003
Text
Summary: This paper focusses on new developments regarding thermal rock fragmentation applications. The technology consists of a strong burner powered by diesel fuel and air. The thermal reaction that is created allows for the enlargement of 125 mm to 450 mm holes by breaking the rock in a spalling effect. It has been used for over 30 years in Russian open pit mining. Following an agreement between Dynamitage T.C.G. Inc. and the owner of the technology, major improvements have been brought to this...
Publication: CIM Bulletin
Author(s): S. Poirier, J.-M. Fecteau, M. Laflamme, D. Brisebois
Keywords: Thermal rock fragmentation, Rock breaking, Open pit mining, Drilling, Bulk sampling, Narrow-vein extraction.
Issue: 1071
Volume: 96
Year: 2003
Powered by Coveo Enterprise Search