Blast movement measurement to control dilution in surface mines

Abstract To minimize ore dilution induced by blast movement in surface mines, it is necessary to quantify such movement. This will enable more accurate location of the grade boundaries beneath the surface of a blasted rock pile before excavation. A method has been developed and tested to accurately measure the direction and magnitude of subsurface blast movement. This technique uses a cesium vapour gradiometer and a real-time, differentially corrected GPS system to locate pre- and post-blast position of magnetically enhanced target objects placed within blastholes inside a bench. The procedure developed does not require the blasted rock to be disturbed, and the movement information is available within a sufficient time to allow for modification of the selective mining boundaries for each surveyed blast. It was found that the maximum depth of target detection was 18 m, with the overall accuracy being measured as ±1 m (horizontally) and ± 1.2 m (vertically).
Keywords: Ore dilution, Blast movement, GPS (Global Positioning System), Field magnetics, Vertical gradient.
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Summary: This paper focuses on a number of interesting results to establish the theory and principle of air-deck blasting. It also gives the mechanism of breakage that takes place in air-deck blasting under varying charge load conditions. With these aspects in mind, the mine management can implement this up-coming technology to enhance safety and higher productivity.
Publication: CIM Bulletin
Author(s): P. Pal Roy, R.B. Singh
Keywords: Air-decking, Presplit blasting, VOD (velocity of detonation), Material decking.
Issue: 1047
Volume: 94
Year: 2001
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Summary: Transmission of vibration to the operator from percussive vibrating tools is increasingly of concern in industrial and mining applications. Prolonged exposure to high levels of vibration transmitted via the hand causes disorders known as hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS). The vascular component of HAVS is called vibration white finger (VWF) and has a debilitating effect on the hand. Vibration at frequencies below 1250 Hz, a tight hand-grip force and cold environments are reported to increase...
Publication: CIM Bulletin
Author(s): K. Prajapati
Keywords: Vibration, Hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS), Vibration white finger (VWF), Vibrating tools.
Issue: 1047
Volume: 94
Year: 2001
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