Geology of the Agnew Lake Mine

The Agnew Lake uranium deposits were discovered in 1953 following the discovery of the Elliot Lake deposits to the west. The original property was optioned to Kerr Addison Mines Limited who added additional claims by staking. Agnew Lake Mines Limited was incorporated in 1967 to develop the property and a shaft was sunk to 1040 metres and five levels developed before work was suspended due to low uranium prices at the end of 1970.
In 1974-75 the mine was dewatered and production started in 1977. By 1978 reserves were estimated at 10,000,000 tonnes averaging 0.35 kg. U10 , per tonne. Underground operations were terminated in 1980 although a uranium leaching operation was continued until early 1983.
The deposits lie near the contact of Huronian metasediments with underlying Algoman granite. The sediments consist of arkose, conglomerate, argillite and quartzite with the uranium mineralogy mainly confined to oligomictic quartz pebble conglomerate. The higher uranium values are related to conglomerate with highest percentage of pebbles. The chief uranium minerals are uranothorite and monazite. It is of interest that the uranium thorium ratio differs appreciably from that of the Elliot Lake deposits. This fact along with the fact that the Elliot Lake sediments were deposited by paleocurrents from the northwest whereas the Agnew Lake sediments were deposited by paleocurrents from the northeast indicates widely separate sources for the deposits. It is suggested that the Agnew Lake uranium deposits are syngenetic placers deposited under anoxygenic atmospheric conditions.
Keywords: Uranium, Uranium exploration, Geology, Agnew Lake Mine
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Text
Publication: Special Volume
Author(s): D. S. ROBERTSON, T. P. PODOLSKY and G. E. NUTTER
Keywords: Uranium, Conglomerate, conglomerate-hosted deposits, geology
Issue: 1986
Volume: SV 33
Year: 1986
Text
Publication: Special Volume
Author(s): DAVID S. ROBERTSON Toronto, Ontario
Keywords: Uranium, Uranium exploration
Issue: 1986
Volume: SV 33
Year: 1986
Text
Publication: Special Volume
Keywords: platinum-group elements, PGE, mineralogy, Recovery, Ores, conventional process
Issue: 1986
Volume: SV 33
Year: 1986
Text
Summary: Uranium, thorium and yttrium have been recovered, since the 1950s, from pyritic quartz-pebble conglomerates occurring in the basal sediments of the Quirke syncline at Elliot Lake. Gold, an element of interest in similar type deposits occurring worldwide, is a very minor constituent of the Elliot Lake conglomerates because the provenance area of the sediments had few gold-bearing rocks.
Uranium, thorium and rare elements are found in resistate and diagenetic minerals occurring in the matrix of...
Publication: Special Volume
Author(s): F.Q. BARNES, Consulting Geologist
Keywords: Uranium, Uranium exploration, Elliot Lake, Quirke syncline, milling
Issue: 1986
Volume: SV 33
Year: 1986
Text
Summary: The Pronto Mine located at the east end of Lake Lauzon, Long Township, some 12 miles east of Blind River is of historic note being the discovery locality and the first producing mine of the Elliot Lake uranium camp. Radioactive bedrock was discovered in 1949, a commercial deposit was verified in 1953 and production commenced in 1955. Production continued to April 1960: total tons milled 2,264,404 from which 4,643,835 pounds U,O, were recovered at a recovered grade of 2.05 pounds U,O. per...
Publication: Special Volume
Author(s): JAMES A. ROBERTSON Policy Advisor, Mineral Resources Branch Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources,** Queen's Park Toronto, Ontario
Keywords: Uranium, Uranium exploration, Pronto Mine, Elliot Lake, Radioactive bedrock, ore grade mineralization
Issue: 1986
Volume: SV 33
Year: 1986
Text
Summary: In the Blind River area Proterozoic clastic and sedimentary rocks and minor volcanic rocks (The Huronian Supergroup) uncomformably overlie and trangress northwards over dominantly granitic Archean terrane (2500 + Ma) and are intruded by Nipissing Diabase (2ll5 Ma). Later deformation and metamorphic events are recognized. The developing depositional basin was controlled by the incipient Great Lakes Tectonic Zone marginal to the Algoman Craton.
The Matinenda Formation (basal Huronian) comprises...
Publication: Special Volume
Author(s): JAMES A. ROBERTSON, Policy Advisor, Mineral Resources Branch, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources **, Queen's Park, Toronto, Ontario
Keywords: Uranium, Uranium exploration, geology, Blind River, metamorphism
Issue: 1986
Volume: SV 33
Year: 1986
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