A comparative study of the use of Caro's acid (peroxymonosulphuric acid) and hydrogen peroxide to oxidize vanadium prior to solvent extraction

Abstract The use of Caro 's acid as a replacement for hydrogen peroxide for the oxidation of vanadium prior to solvent extraction resulted in a 56% reduction in oxidant usage when compared on an equivalent hydrogen peroxide basis. Comparative oxidation tests, using two actual uranium mill raffinates, resulted in premature precipitation of an amorphous ferric vanadate when hydrogen peroxide was used to oxidize one of the raffinates containing a high iron to vanadium ratio. The use of Caro's acid eliminated the precipitation problem, thereby permitting the adjustment of the raffinate pH to a higher, more favourable level prior to solvent extraction.
Potentiometric characterization of the raffinates revealed that vanadium is responsible for the inefficiency of hydrogen peroxide compared with Caro's acid, with the oxidation efficiency of iron being the same for both oxidants. A limiting potential between 720 and 740 mV was observed when using hydrogen peroxide, while, when using Caro's acid, potentials approaching 1200 m V were achievable.
A four-stage, countercurrent extraction performed on the oxidized raffinates did not reveal any operational problems. The extraction efficiency and the extraction coefficient were found to be higher when Caro's acid was used as the oxidant, as opposed to hydrogen peroxide.
Keywords: Solvent extraction, Caro's acid, Hydrogen peroxide, Vanadium, Oxidation, Uranium, Mill raffinates, Redox chemistry.
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Publication: CIM Bulletin
Author(s): D.D. HOGARTH
Issue: 854
Volume: 76
Year: 1983
Text
Summary: The closure of the iron and steel making plant at Consett in Durham in 1980 marked the end of an era—a long era in the world's iron and steel making history. Iron had been smelted in the Tyne- Wear area of the United Kingdom since before the Roman period, but apart from evidence of smithing in the Roman period, the historical evidence for iron production on a large scale dates from the 14th century.
The paper describes sites in the area that first worked the bloomery process and then,...
Publication: CIM Bulletin
Author(s): R.F. TYLECOTE
Issue: 854
Volume: 76
Year: 1983
Text
Summary: The closure of the iron and steel making plant at Consett in Durham in 1980 marked the end of an era—a long era in the world's iron and steel making history. Iron had been smelted in the Tyne- Wear area of the United Kingdom since before the Roman period, but apart from evidence of smithing in the Roman period, the historical evidence for iron production on a large scale dates from the 14th century.
The paper describes sites in the area that first worked the bloomery process and then,...
Publication: CIM Bulletin
Author(s): R.F. TYLECOTE
Issue: 854
Volume: 76
Year: 1983
Text
Summary: The mid-Cretaceous Seagull batholith intruded Mississippian sedimentary and volcanic rocks and Jurassicf?) granitic and ultramafic rocks within the Omineca Crystalline Belt in the Yukon Territory near the British Columbia boundary. Leuco-cratic fluorine- and boron-rich granites of the batholith exhibit many textural variations from aplite to pegmatite, but are dominated by a coarse-grained seriate unit and a fine-grained porphyritic unit.
Four distinctive tin vein occurrences within and near...
Publication: CIM Bulletin
Author(s): GONZALO MATO, G. DITSON, COLIN GODWIN
Keywords: Economic geology, Tin mineralization, Seagull batholith, Yukon Territory, Tungsten, Canadian Cordillera, MC showing, EC showing, DU showing, VAL showing.
Issue: 854
Volume: 76
Year: 1983
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