International network for acid prevention progress towards a global organization

Abstract In 1997, a group of Canadian mining companies met to review the Mine Environment Neutral Drainage (MEND) program and to consider future activities. They concluded that Canadian industry and Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) should fund a small secretariat in Ottawa to support technology transfer in Canada, and that it was important for industry to continue the momentum of MEND on an international scale.
The need for the International Network for Acid Prevention (INAP) was strongly endorsed by consultants, company, university, and government experts from Australia, Canada, and the United States. The initial focus was the development of a solid knowledge base covering the collective experience of INAP’s members to promote the dissemination of successful practices, the identification of knowledge gaps, and the formulation of effective research proposals. The sharing of information on past successes and failures alone was viewed as sufficient justification for the formation of INAP.
What is INAP?
The International Network for Acid Prevention was officially launched in October 1998 and is now an industry-based initiative that aims to globally coordinate research and development into the management of sulphide mine wastes. The principal objectives of INAP are to promote significant improvements in the management of sulphidic mine materials and the reduction of liability associated with acid drainage through knowledge sharing and research and development of technology. To meet these objectives INAP will:

achieve a significant reduction in the liability associated with mine materials through information sharing, collaborative research, and implementation of best management practices through the complete mining business cycle;
build credibility with key stakeholders through their engagement in the affairs of INAP and the collaborative development of a worldwide guide based on best management and technical practices as applied to acid prevention and control; and
establish an organization with demonstrated structure and abilities to make long-term improvements in acid prevention and other environmental issues on the basis of global cooperation and action.

How is INAP Organized?
INAP members are mining companies who wish to work collaboratively to address acid drainage. INAP works via a board (made up of senior managers elected by the member companies) and a technical panel that coordinates the technical ideas and issues to ensure the topics important to industry are addressed.
Currently, the Board of Directors is comprised of senior mining executives who are responsible for providing the leadership and support necessary for INAP to meet its objectives.
The main activities of INAP are being directed by an Operating Committee appointed by the Board. The committee is comprised of several senior technical representatives from the member companies; its main responsibilities are to:

ensure that the technical and communication needs of the members are identified and prioritized;
establish panels and networks for specific technical issues in keeping with members’ interests;
develop programs and projects to meet the technical and strategic communications objectives of INAP;
foster the development of research ideas and proposals; and
facilitate the approval and conduct of brokered research projects.

The manager supports the Board and Operating Committee by maintaining information transfer systems, reporting, and administrative services.
INAP members currently include BHP Billiton, Rio Tinto, Noranda Falconbridge, Phelps Dodge, Barrick, Inco, and Placer Dome. INAP also facilitates the ‘Global ARD Alliance’ which aims to maintain dialogue and share information with key regional ARD organizations. Current alliance partners include: Mine Environment Neutral Drainage (MEND) program (Canada); Acid Drainage Technology Initiative (United States); Australian Centre for Mine Extension and Research (Australia); and Partnership for Acid Drainage Remediation in Europe (United Kingdom).
Program results, research initiatives, and workshops (old and new) can be found online at www.inap.com.au.
Keywords: International Network for Acid Prevention,Waste management, Acid drainage.
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Summary: Environmental desulphurization is an attractive alternative for the management of acid generating tailings. Sulphide bulk flotation is the most commonly used method to produce desulphurized tailings, as shown from many previous works. This process can reduce the volume of problematic tailings to manage by making a sulphide fraction concentrate. The desulphurized tailings can then be used as construction material for an engineered cover to prevent acid mine drainage.
Results from different...
Publication: CIM Bulletin
Author(s): D. Bois, M. Benzaazoua, B. Bussière, M. Kongolo, P. Poirier
Keywords: Desulphurized tailings, Acid mine drainage, Dry cover, Water covers, Paste backfill.
Issue: 1087
Volume: 98
Year: 2005
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Summary: Traditional planning of mines and scheduling of production is largely based upon the modelling of ore grade. It is known, however, that grade is not the only characteristic that can be taken into account to maximize performance at the processing plant and efficiency of tailings disposal. Ore processing plants respond well to feed that is consistent over time and that has known physico-chemical characteristics, which can be used to improve plant design and performance through the management of...
Publication: CIM Bulletin
Author(s): A. Richmond, R. Dimitrakopoulos
Keywords: Stochastic spatial simulation, Ore texture, Ore reserves.
Issue: 1087
Volume: 98
Year: 2005
Text
Summary: Over the last few years, a number of research projects to prove out the concept of applying fuel cell technology to underground mining vehicles have been managed by Vehicle Projects LLC for the Fuelcell Propulsion Institute. These have been carried out with the support of mining companies, trade unions, regulatory agencies, equipment manufacturers, research laboratories, technology developers, universities, and consultants.
Hydrogen fuel cell technology is clean and produces only water and...
Publication: CIM Bulletin
Author(s): M.C. Bétournay, P. Laliberté, R. Lacroix, C. Kocsis, S. Hardcastle, G. Desrivières, P. Mousset-Jones, G. Righettini
Keywords: Fuel cell, Diesel, Costs, Benefits
Issue: 1087
Volume: 98
Year: 2005
Text
Summary: The 20th century saw changes in the mining and metallurgical industry not only technically but also in social and environmental expectations. As projects become larger their visibility raises concerns among communities of interest, and mining companies must adopt a transparent and open approach to assure success. An equally important task is to anticipate the standards that will be required to meet expectations.
Early mines left waste and spoil piles around the surface and the images of...
Publication: CIM Bulletin
Author(s): D.J. Kemp
Keywords: Sustainable standards, Sustainable development, Environmental awareness, Corporate attitudes, Community attitudes.
Issue: 1087
Volume: 98
Year: 2005
Text
Summary: The world’s first hydrogen fuel cell locomotive was successfully demonstrated at the Placer Dome Campbell Mine in Balmertown, Ontario. This demonstration was a success based on the following criteria:

safely demonstrated the operation of a hydrogen-powered fuel cell locomotive in a production situation;
determined the regulatory and operational requirements for future fuel cell mining equipment;
determined technical and soft issues critical for future fuel cell applications; and
determined...
Publication: CIM Bulletin
Author(s): F.C. Delabbio, D. Eastick, C. Graves, D. Sprott, T. MacKinnon, M.C. Bétournay
Keywords: Fuel cell, Risk management, Regulatory compliance, Campbell Mine.
Issue: 1087
Volume: 98
Year: 2005
Text
Summary: The Las Cristinas deposit in Venezuela contains proven and probable reserves of 12.8 million ounces of gold at a grade of 1.20 g/t. The deposit comprises fully oxidized saprolite (SAPO) overlying a layer of sulphide-enriched saprolite (SAPS) which lies above carbonate- leached bedrock (CLB) and carbonate stable or un-leached bedrock (CSB). Gold occurs at a similar concentration in all lithological units.
Virtually all of the copper originally in SAPO has been leached out and deposited in the...
Publication: CIM Bulletin
Author(s): J.R. Goode, K.G. Thomas
Keywords: Las Cristinas, Gold, Saprolite, Gravity, Leaching, CIL, Thickening, Rheology, Natural degradation, Cyanide destruction, Plant design.
Issue: 1087
Volume: 98
Year: 2005
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