The JORC Code - Maintaining the standard

Abstract The Australasian Code for Reporting of Mineral Resources and Ore Reserves (JORC Code) has been operating successfully for 14 years, and has an ancestry dating back over 30 years. Together with complementary developments in stock exchange listing rules, the Code has brought about substantially improved standards of public reporting by Australasian mining and exploration companies. The Code is regarded as a world leader in its field, and has been used as a basis for the development of resource/reserve reporting standards in other countries. The reasons for its success are varied, foremost among them being its adoption in full by the Australian and New Zealand stock exchanges, and the ability and willingness of mining industry organizations to bring Competent Persons to account when necessary. The latest revision of the JORC Code was undertaken in 2002-2003, based in part on releases of upgraded reporting standards in Canada, the United Kingdom/Western Europe, and South Africa, and the 2003 edition is expected to be released mid-year. Two of the more significant changes are: the introduction of a requirement for a Competent Person to be responsible for the documentation upon which Exploration Results are reported; and inclusion in the definition of a Competent Person of a reference to “Recognized Overseas Professional Organizations” being overseas professional organizations to which Competent Persons may belong for the purpose of preparing documentation for the submission of reports to the Australian Stock Exchange.
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Publication: CIM Bulletin
Author(s): J.A. McLennan and C.V. Deutsch
Issue: 1080
Volume: 97
Year: 2004
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Summary: Agnico-Eagle started sinking the Penna Shaft in 1995 with a hoisting plant capable of hoisting 1800 t/d from a 2240 m deep shaft. Exploration success led to the installation of a hoisting plant capable of extracting 4500 t of ore and 1800 t of waste per day from a depth of 2210 m. The introduction of a new rope selection factor, permitting a safety factor of 4.0, represented the breakthrough required for a cost-effective project. This paper describes the process taken to introduce the new...
Publication: CIM Bulletin
Author(s): B. McLaughlin
Keywords: Hoisting, Deep shaft, Monitoring, Rope selection, Safety, Regulations.
Issue: 1080
Volume: 97
Year: 2004
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Summary: For mining companies facing strong international competition and unfavourable commodities’ prices, automation of underground operations has the potential to increase productivity and help cut costs. However, despite considerable technological progress in this field, there still remain many problems to overcome. Furthermore, successful implementation of automation depends also on numerous operational, organizational, and even human factors. In this context, this paper briefly reviews technolog...
Publication: CIM Bulletin
Author(s): J. Paraszczak, S. Planeta
Keywords: Underground mining, Automation, Implementation.
Issue: 1080
Volume: 97
Year: 2004
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Summary: Worldwide, metal mines are going deeper. For example, in Canada there are six such mechanized mines planning production at 3000 m (10 000 ft). Working at such depths challenges all aspects of mining including the provision of ventilation to supply an equitable working climate for personnel and machinery. This paper explores the overall challenges of supplying ventilation in Canada’s deepest mines and how the volumes required could be minimized. This is essential because it must be remembered...
Publication: CIM Bulletin
Author(s): S.G. Hardcastle, C.K. Kocsis
Keywords: Deep mining, Ventilation, Mechanization, Health, Environment.
Issue: 1080
Volume: 97
Year: 2004
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Summary: Noranda’s Brunswick mine is a 10 000 t/d producer of lead-zinc-copper-silver ore that has been in operation since 1964. Mining of this multiple lens deposit is primarily by blasthole stoping techniques between 400 m and 1200 m below surface. The combination of a high overall extraction ratio, an overall steeply dipping tabular shape, and high horizontal stresses (twice the vertical) have elevated the induced stress regime to levels comparable to much deeper operations. Improved mine design,...
Publication: CIM Bulletin
Author(s): B. Simser, V. Falmagne
Keywords: Rockmass, Seismic monitoring, Stress, Brunswick mine.
Issue: 1080
Volume: 97
Year: 2004
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Summary: Many underground mines are achieving extended life and optimizing existing facilities by mining at greater depths. The challenges to do this require a sound engineering approach to mine design and mine services, as well as ingenuity in safety design. The social consequence is full utilization of existing infrastructure.
Accessing ores at depths of 2000 m to 3000 m requires exceptional hoisting design. May’s theme issue includes a paper that examines a case study of one such hoisting plant,...
Publication: CIM Bulletin
Keywords: Mining at depth
Issue: 1080
Volume: 97
Year: 2004
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