The “Mill Redesign Project” at Inco’s Clarabelle Mill

Improving mill grade recovery relationships
is always good business. Inco’s Clarabelle
mill has just undergone a $16 M process upgrade that was designed to improve nickel recovery by 2%. The “Mill Redesign Project” was completed on time, under budget and delivered the promised improvement in recoveries. This paper describes the methodology of the Mill Redesign Project team, details of the process improvements and the critical success factors that helped the team deliver on its promises. With a payback of under one year, the Mill Redesign Project will play a key role in ensuring a competitive edge as Inco embarks on its second century of operation.
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Summary: Pitting corrosion inhibition of 304 stainless
steel (SS) in groundwater with a ternary inhibitor mixture (phosphonic acid + bivalent cation + various surfactants) was studied with different environmental variables such as temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen and chloride ions. Critical pitting potential and corrosion potential were calculated for these test media using electrochemical techniques. Under the tested condition, the localized corrosion resistance of 304 SS was determined and the...
Publication: CIM Bulletin
Author(s): D. Gopi, S. Rajeswari
Issue: 1075
Volume: 96
Year: 2003
Text
Summary: This paper reports the results of the field
demonstration campaign of a new process for
removing and destroying ammonia from mining/metallurgical effluent solutions. The 50-day campaign was carried out at a uranium plant in Saskatchewan, Canada. The process was developed by adapting and integrating two wellestablished technologies: zeolite adsorption/elution to extract the ammonia from the effluent stream and to produce a concentrated ammonia eluate; and conversion of the in the eluate to...
Publication: CIM Bulletin
Author(s): W.D. Gould, D.W. Koren, P. Bédard, R. Molnar
Issue: 1075
Volume: 96
Year: 2003
Text
Summary: A large-scale panel destress blast was fired at Brunswick mine in the fall of 1999 in order to reduce the ground stresses in a critically
important neighbouring mining region. This work, sponsored by the Mining Division of CAMIRO and Brunswick mine, consisted in
heavily choke-blasting — and subsequently
leaving in place — a massive waste sulphide
pillar in the southwest end of the 1000 m level.
This paper describes the approach and design methodology used to try to maximize breakage in the...
Publication: CIM Bulletin
Author(s): P.P. Andrieux, R.K. Brummer, Q. Liu, B.P. Simser, A. Mortazavi
Issue: 1075
Volume: 96
Year: 2003
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