DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF HYDROSTATIC MINE SHAFT LINERS USING CAST IRON TUBBING TECHNOLOGY

World Mining Congress
The design of hydrostatic liner for a deep potash mine shaft in Saskatchewan poses tremendous technological challenges. Technology has evolved to a point where one could consider a new innovative approach to hydrostatic liner design. But there is still a place for conventional technologies such as cast iron tubbings. As will be discussed in this paper, improvement to manufacturing process, installation procedures and even new materials can bring this technology to an excellent level of performance. With the spur of new projects in the potash industry of Saskatchewan, the authors worked in various shaft liner designs from the conceptual stage through to the construction phase. They were either directly leading the design work on some of these projects or acting as an external reviewer on others. Most of these shaft liner designs involved cast iron tubbing technology and ground freezing. The major challenge in sinking potash shafts in Saskatchewan is to go through a water-bearing ground formation under high pressure, known as the Blairmore or Manville fm. The only proven stabilizing technology for these formations is ground freezing. For a potash shaft, dry shaft conditions are highly desired, so a fully waterproof hydrostatic liner is required. All the existing potash mine shafts in Saskatchewan, except for two with composite steelconcrete lining, used the cast iron tubbing technology.
Keywords: liners; Liner; liners; Design; Shafts; Concrete; Installation; Bolts; Standards;
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