VOLUNTARY REPORTING OF “NEGATIVE” GRI INDICATORS: INSIGHTS FROM INTEGRATIVE SOCIAL CONTRACTS THEORY

World Mining Congress
This paper explores Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) reporting practices within the mining industry. Specifically, this paper investigates how and why a mining company makes voluntary reporting decisions to include the GRI indicators that may be considered “negative” to the company’s reputation. Due to the voluntary nature of the GRI Guidelines, a GRI adopter is not legally obligated to report every GRI indicator. Not surprisingly, empirical studies that evaluated the extent to which companies’ sustainability reports meet the GRI requirements (Guenther, Hoppe, & Poser, 2006; Morhardt, Baird, & Freeman, 2002; Samy, Odemilin, & Bampton, 2010; Skouloudis, Evangelinos, & Kourmousis, 2009) have found that reporting practices of the companies under their studies are well below the standards reflected in the GRI Guidelines. An influential study by Clarkson et al (2008) uses economic-based and socio-political theories to explain variation in companies’ environmental disclosure.
Keywords: Reports; Reporting; sustainability; contract; Contracts; mining; Guidelines; Information; Canadian;
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