Georges J. Kipouros

  • Dates:
    Apr 20, 2010
  • Event Type:
    Distinguished Lecturer

Organized By

Carmen Storey, Director of CIM Red Lake Branch Andreas Lichtblau, Director of CIM Red Lake Branch

Contact Information

Carmen Storey
Director of Red Lake Branch
(807) 727-3272
carmen.storey@ontario.ca
Event has already ended

Materials and Asset Integrity

Georges J. Kipouros obtained his Diploma of Engineering at the National Technical University of Athens, Greece, and his M.Sc. and PhD from the University of Toronto. He then worked at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) for three years as a postdoctoral research associate.  For the next five years, he worked for General Motors Research Laboratories in Warren, Michigan, as a senior research scientist. Returning to academia, he joined Dalhousie Technical University where he is currently a professor of materials engineering in the Department of Process Engineering and Applied Science, and director of the Minerals Engineering Centre.

The extraction and transportation of minerals require a continuous development of new and sophisticated assets that include devices and lightweight structures.  Many advances have relied on the development of new materials while others are limited by the lack of suitable materials. Asset integrity includes protection from degradation, particularly corrosion, which in turn requires the development of new materials and designs.  The lecture will discuss the present understanding of the interplay between materials and their environment, the design of materials and the effects of these parameters on corrosion.

Event Detail

Highlights

Materials and Asset Integrity

Georges J. Kipouros obtained his Diploma of Engineering at the National Technical University of Athens, Greece, and his M.Sc. and PhD from the University of Toronto. He then worked at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) for three years as a postdoctoral research associate.  For the next five years, he worked for General Motors Research Laboratories in Warren, Michigan, as a senior research scientist. Returning to academia, he joined Dalhousie Technical University where he is currently a professor of materials engineering in the Department of Process Engineering and Applied Science, and director of the Minerals Engineering Centre.

The extraction and transportation of minerals require a continuous development of new and sophisticated assets that include devices and lightweight structures.  Many advances have relied on the development of new materials while others are limited by the lack of suitable materials. Asset integrity includes protection from degradation, particularly corrosion, which in turn requires the development of new materials and designs.  The lecture will discuss the present understanding of the interplay between materials and their environment, the design of materials and the effects of these parameters on corrosion.