Freedom of Association: Harmonizing Canadian Norms with International Obligations, a Conference, Saskatoon, SK

  • Dates:
    Feb 25 - 27, 2010
  • Event Type:
    Conference

Organized By

Graduate School of Public Policy, University of Saskatchewan

Contact Information

Roy Adams
roy.adams@usask.ca
Event has already ended

In 2007 the Supreme Court of Canada brought Canadian law into line with international standards when it declared collective bargaining to be an inherent aspect of Charter-protected freedom of association. In its BC Health Services case, the Court stated that the “Charter should be presumed to provide at least as great a level of protection as is found in the international human rights documents that Canada has ratified.”

This conference will review the character, evolution and status of freedom of association at work as a global right, will examine domestic law and practice in light of Canada’s international obligations and, to the extent that they are incompatible, will explore ways that Canadian norms may be harmonized with Canada’s international obligations.

Join us on February 25-27, 2010 at the College of Law, University of Saskatchewan, for a conference on one of the most critical issues facing the Canadian labour relations and human rights communities. Should the Supreme Court hold true to its promise to ensure that all Canadians are able to rely upon the international human rights principles contained in the documents that Canada has ratified, significant change may have to occur in contemporary policy and practice. Although a broad range of issues will be discussed, particular attention will be paid to recent Canadian jurisprudence, the right to strike and non-statutory unionism as an alternative or complement to majoritarian exclusivity.

Roy J. Adams, Ariel F. Sallows Chair of Human Rights, College of Law, U of S
Michael Atkinson, Executive Director, Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy

Event Detail

Highlights

In 2007 the Supreme Court of Canada brought Canadian law into line with international standards when it declared collective bargaining to be an inherent aspect of Charter-protected freedom of association. In its BC Health Services case, the Court stated that the “Charter should be presumed to provide at least as great a level of protection as is found in the international human rights documents that Canada has ratified.”

This conference will review the character, evolution and status of freedom of association at work as a global right, will examine domestic law and practice in light of Canada’s international obligations and, to the extent that they are incompatible, will explore ways that Canadian norms may be harmonized with Canada’s international obligations.

Join us on February 25-27, 2010 at the College of Law, University of Saskatchewan, for a conference on one of the most critical issues facing the Canadian labour relations and human rights communities. Should the Supreme Court hold true to its promise to ensure that all Canadians are able to rely upon the international human rights principles contained in the documents that Canada has ratified, significant change may have to occur in contemporary policy and practice. Although a broad range of issues will be discussed, particular attention will be paid to recent Canadian jurisprudence, the right to strike and non-statutory unionism as an alternative or complement to majoritarian exclusivity.

Roy J. Adams, Ariel F. Sallows Chair of Human Rights, College of Law, U of S
Michael Atkinson, Executive Director, Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy